Authors: Syafri Kamsul Arif

 In Original Article

Abstract

Sepsis is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit (ICU).

Objective: To determine the possibility of eosinophil as indicator for organ dysfunctions in sepsis patients and septic shock patients in ICU.

Design: Prospective.

Setting: Intensive care unit (ICU) Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital, Makassar.

Participants: Adult sepsis patients admitted to ICU from October to December 2018.

Measurement: Eosinophils count and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were assessed within 24 hours and after 72 hours after patients admitted in ICU. The patients were categorized into non- and organ dysfunction groups based on SOFA scores after 72 hours. Outcomes of the patients then evaluated at day 7.

Results: Thirty four sepsis patients participated in the study. The mean of SOFA scores between non- and organ dysfunction groups were not different within 24 hours after admission but then showed a difference after 72 hours (p=0.558 and p<0.001, respectively). In contrast with non-organ dysfunction patients, after 72 hours the eosinophil count in organ dysfunction group decreased (from 0.51 to 0.15 cells/µl). There was a negative correlation between eosinophil count and SOFA scores at 72 hours (p=0.043; rho: -0.350). In discriminating non-organ dysfunction and organ dysfunction groups, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.714. Eosinophils at 0.5 cells/µl (eosinopenia) yielded a sensitivity of 92.8%, a specificity of 66.6%, a positive predictive value of 92.8%, and a negative predictive value of 66,6%.

Conclusion: Eosinopenia levels might be used as an indicator for organ dysfunction in critically ill patients, including sepsis patients, in area where laboratory facility is limited.

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